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Training the trainers: contemporary programs for expanding the global neurosurgery workforce
EANS Academy. Rosseau G. 09/26/19; 276136; EP13011
Gail Rosseau
Gail Rosseau

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The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery identified tremendous deficiencies in global surgical services, estimating that 5 billion people lack access to even emergency and essential surgery. It has been estimated that there is a global deficit of 23,000 neurosurgeons needed to address the 10 million urgent neurosurgical operations currently left undone. The myth that neurosurgical care is a luxury has been debunked: there is a projected $4.4 trillion in gross domestic product losses from 2015 to 2010 in low -and middle- income countries (LMICs) due to neurosurgical disease.
The Lancet Commission Report led to unanimous passage of World Health Assembly Resolution 68.15 in 2015, calling on all United Nations member states to strengthen emergency and essential surgery as part of universal health care. The global neurosurgical community has responded promptly and generously to these identified needs for support for neurosurgical care and education, particularly in LMIC. Noting that the gap between the existing neurosurgical workforce and desirable work force may be partially bridged by seasoned, dynamic neurosurgeons, courses have been developed to prepare humanitarian neurosurgeons to be effective neurosurgical caregivers and educators in the developing world. Drawing on the experience of the general surgery community and using their successful courses as templates, organized neurosurgery is beginning to offer courses to prepare trained neurosurgeons, both senior residents and senior practitioners, to be effective volunteers in LMIC. The neurosurgical curriculum and its development are described, as are the efforts in other surgical disciplines, namely obstetrics and gynecology and orthopedic surgery, which this early experience has inspired. Early qualitative data from the first such course, offered in April 2019 at the AANS Annual Meeting is described. An opportunity for EANS member to provide input into the 2010 EANS-WFNS course is provided.
The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery identified tremendous deficiencies in global surgical services, estimating that 5 billion people lack access to even emergency and essential surgery. It has been estimated that there is a global deficit of 23,000 neurosurgeons needed to address the 10 million urgent neurosurgical operations currently left undone. The myth that neurosurgical care is a luxury has been debunked: there is a projected $4.4 trillion in gross domestic product losses from 2015 to 2010 in low -and middle- income countries (LMICs) due to neurosurgical disease.
The Lancet Commission Report led to unanimous passage of World Health Assembly Resolution 68.15 in 2015, calling on all United Nations member states to strengthen emergency and essential surgery as part of universal health care. The global neurosurgical community has responded promptly and generously to these identified needs for support for neurosurgical care and education, particularly in LMIC. Noting that the gap between the existing neurosurgical workforce and desirable work force may be partially bridged by seasoned, dynamic neurosurgeons, courses have been developed to prepare humanitarian neurosurgeons to be effective neurosurgical caregivers and educators in the developing world. Drawing on the experience of the general surgery community and using their successful courses as templates, organized neurosurgery is beginning to offer courses to prepare trained neurosurgeons, both senior residents and senior practitioners, to be effective volunteers in LMIC. The neurosurgical curriculum and its development are described, as are the efforts in other surgical disciplines, namely obstetrics and gynecology and orthopedic surgery, which this early experience has inspired. Early qualitative data from the first such course, offered in April 2019 at the AANS Annual Meeting is described. An opportunity for EANS member to provide input into the 2010 EANS-WFNS course is provided.
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