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Development of a 3D printed glioma model
EANS Academy. Zhang X. 09/26/19; 275938; EP12054
Dr. Xinzhi Zhang
Dr. Xinzhi Zhang

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Abstract
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Background: In the development of anti-glioma drug, one approach is to target the vascularization process. Currently, there is an unmet need of in vitro models that could accurately recapitulate the in vivo tumor microenvironment, especially for vascularization which involves at least glioma stem cells (GSCs) that secret vascular endothelial growth factor, and endothelium cells that form the vessels.
Methods: 3D bioprinting can be used to print cell-containing constructs with complex shape, and we have successfully printed constructs containing GSCs. The next step would be to invest interactions between printed GSCs and endothelium cells. Therefore, in this study we printed constructs containing GSCs, and co-cultured brain endothelium cells with them. The parameters invested were migration and differentiation of endothelium cells, and the formation of blood vessel-like structures. After culturing for a period of time, the co-cultured endothelium cells were collected, and the expression of markers such as CD31, CD105, VEGFR2 that are related to new vessel formation was investigated. Control groups were printed constructs containing GSCs without co-culturing with endothelium cells, and co-cultured direct mix of GSCs with endothelium cells.
Results: To date, GSCs containing constructs were successfully printed and co-cultured with endothelium cells. Both type of cells maintained high viability and proliferation rate over the period of culture time. Compared with both controls, the number of formed human brain microvascular endothelial cell meshes in the experimental group was significantly higher.
Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrated the potential of the co-culture model to be used for anti-glioma drug development. The next step would be to look into vessel formation-related marker expression, and to verify the effectiveness of this model in vivo.
Background: In the development of anti-glioma drug, one approach is to target the vascularization process. Currently, there is an unmet need of in vitro models that could accurately recapitulate the in vivo tumor microenvironment, especially for vascularization which involves at least glioma stem cells (GSCs) that secret vascular endothelial growth factor, and endothelium cells that form the vessels.
Methods: 3D bioprinting can be used to print cell-containing constructs with complex shape, and we have successfully printed constructs containing GSCs. The next step would be to invest interactions between printed GSCs and endothelium cells. Therefore, in this study we printed constructs containing GSCs, and co-cultured brain endothelium cells with them. The parameters invested were migration and differentiation of endothelium cells, and the formation of blood vessel-like structures. After culturing for a period of time, the co-cultured endothelium cells were collected, and the expression of markers such as CD31, CD105, VEGFR2 that are related to new vessel formation was investigated. Control groups were printed constructs containing GSCs without co-culturing with endothelium cells, and co-cultured direct mix of GSCs with endothelium cells.
Results: To date, GSCs containing constructs were successfully printed and co-cultured with endothelium cells. Both type of cells maintained high viability and proliferation rate over the period of culture time. Compared with both controls, the number of formed human brain microvascular endothelial cell meshes in the experimental group was significantly higher.
Conclusions: Preliminary results demonstrated the potential of the co-culture model to be used for anti-glioma drug development. The next step would be to look into vessel formation-related marker expression, and to verify the effectiveness of this model in vivo.
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