The anatomy of petrosquamosal sinus: a meta-analysis and radiological study
EANS Academy. Skinningsrud B. 09/25/19; 275880; EP01112
Mr. Bendik Skinningsrud
Mr. Bendik Skinningsrud

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Abstract
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Background: Persistent emissary veins arising from the sigmoid or transverse sinus remain poorly defined due to their anatomical variations. The petrosquamosal sinus (PSS) is an embryonic emissary vein of the temporal bone that normally regresses during fetal life. If present and unrecognized, iatrogenic injury can occur. The aim of our study was to assess the imaging characteristics of the PSS on CT and conduct a meta-analysis by pooling together all available studies to establish its prevalence and anatomical characteristics in the population.
Methods: Our original radiological study included CT scans of 388 patients at least 18 years of age. We searched PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, and China Academic Journals full-text database to identify articles eligible for inclusion in our meta-analysis. We included studies reporting data on study modality, prevalence, ethnicity, gender, side, laterality, and mean diameter. The extracted data was pooled into a meta-analysis with a random-effects model using MetaXL. The Chi2 test and the Higgins I2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity among the included studies.
Results: The overall prevalence of the PSS in the population was 11.1%. It was more common in women (27.4%) than men (17.6%), and a unilateral PSS was more common (78.2%) than a bilateral one (21.8%). In our radiological study, the PSS was visualized in 25.5% of the sides examined, it was slightly more common among women (27.5%) than men (23.8%), and on the right side (29.4%) than the left side (21.7%). Its mean diameter was 1.14±0.58mm.
Conclusions: Petrosquamosal sinus is not a rare or abnormal finding in humans as it is present in over one tenth of the population. Therefore, it should be identified by thorough examination of radiographic findings before surgical procedures in the petrous and mastoid regions are performed.
Background: Persistent emissary veins arising from the sigmoid or transverse sinus remain poorly defined due to their anatomical variations. The petrosquamosal sinus (PSS) is an embryonic emissary vein of the temporal bone that normally regresses during fetal life. If present and unrecognized, iatrogenic injury can occur. The aim of our study was to assess the imaging characteristics of the PSS on CT and conduct a meta-analysis by pooling together all available studies to establish its prevalence and anatomical characteristics in the population.
Methods: Our original radiological study included CT scans of 388 patients at least 18 years of age. We searched PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, and China Academic Journals full-text database to identify articles eligible for inclusion in our meta-analysis. We included studies reporting data on study modality, prevalence, ethnicity, gender, side, laterality, and mean diameter. The extracted data was pooled into a meta-analysis with a random-effects model using MetaXL. The Chi2 test and the Higgins I2 statistics were used to assess heterogeneity among the included studies.
Results: The overall prevalence of the PSS in the population was 11.1%. It was more common in women (27.4%) than men (17.6%), and a unilateral PSS was more common (78.2%) than a bilateral one (21.8%). In our radiological study, the PSS was visualized in 25.5% of the sides examined, it was slightly more common among women (27.5%) than men (23.8%), and on the right side (29.4%) than the left side (21.7%). Its mean diameter was 1.14±0.58mm.
Conclusions: Petrosquamosal sinus is not a rare or abnormal finding in humans as it is present in over one tenth of the population. Therefore, it should be identified by thorough examination of radiographic findings before surgical procedures in the petrous and mastoid regions are performed.
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