Save
Triple Conjoint lumbosacral nerve root: a special case of sciatic pain
Author(s): ,
S. Hendrickx
Affiliations:
AZ Delta, Neurosurgery, Roeselare, Belgium
,
T. Couvreur
Affiliations:
AZ Delta, Neurosurgery, Roeselare, Belgium
,
D. Vanhauwaert
Affiliations:
AZ Delta, Neurosurgery, Roeselare, Belgium
O. Van Damme
Affiliations:
AZ Delta, Neurosurgery, Roeselare, Belgium
EANS Academy. Hendrickx S. Oct 21, 2018; 225825; EP2004
Sarah Hendrickx
Sarah Hendrickx
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

Access to Privileged content is currently a membership benefit.

Click here to join EANS or renew your membership.
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Introduction: Conjoint nerve root is a benign development anomaly, most common present in the lumbosacral region. There have been some case reports of bifid, conjoint lumbosacral nerve roots. This variation in anatomy gives the involved nerves less space Therefore multiple nerves are at risk for compression or entrapment at one level. L5 and S1 roots are most frequently involved (50%), followed by S2 anomalies (30%). Several classifications have been describing different types of anomaly.

Case: We report a case of a triple conjoint root of L5, S1 and S2 nerves with duplication of S2. A 52-year-old female patient complained of acute back pain with radiation in the left leg matching with both L5 and S1 roots. There was loss of power in extensor muscles of the left foot with grade 3 on the Medical Research Council (MRC) grading scale. MRI showed a foraminal disc herniation at L5-S1 disc level, compressing both L5 and S1. Needle electromyography was abnormal and concordant with L5 and S1 radiculopathy. Initially, the patient preferred non-surgical treatment with oral pain killers and a transforaminal epidural infiltration. Due to insufficient result on pain relief, a lumbar microdiscectomy was done 11 days after onset . All symptoms fully disappeared after surgery.

Conclusion: Knowledge of the existence of such development anomaly is of great importance for all spinal surgeons, as the anomalous root can be misinterpreted as a mass lesion, leading to an intervention at an incorrect level or accidentally causing nerve damage during surgery.



[Figure 1: Case report: a 52-year old female patient with sciatic pain.]

Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.



Google Analytics is used for user behavior tracking/reporting. Google Analytics works in parallel and independently from MLG’s features. Google Analytics relies on cookies and these cookies can be used by Google to track users across different platforms/services.


Save Settings