Save
PGE2 causes biphasic vasomotor response of human cerebral arterioles
Author(s): ,
A. Czigler
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary; University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Translational Medicine, Pécs, Hungary
,
L. Tóth
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary; University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Translational Medicine, Pécs, Hungary
,
N. Szarka
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary; University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Translational Medicine, Pécs, Hungary
,
K. Szilágyi
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary; University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Translational Medicine, Pécs, Hungary
,
Z. Ungvári
Affiliations:
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oklahoma City, United States
,
Á. Koller
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary; University of Physical Education, Institute of Natural Sciences, Budapest, Hungary; New York Medical College, Department of Physiology, Valhalla, United States
,
A. Szólics
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary
,
A. Büki
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary
P. Tóth
Affiliations:
University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery and Szentagothai Research Center, Pécs, Hungary; University of Pecs Medical School, Department of Translational Medicine, Pécs, Hungary; University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Donald W. Reynolds Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oklahoma City, United States
EANS Academy. Czigler A. Oct 21, 2018; 225710; EP1029
Dr. András Czigler
Dr. András Czigler
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.

Access to Privileged content is currently a membership benefit.

Click here to join EANS or renew your membership.
Abstract
Discussion Forum (0)
Rate & Comment (0)
Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) has been suggested to contribute to both vasodilation and vasoconstriction in the human brain in physiological and pathological conditions. For instance, it is involved in neurovascular hyperemia and migraine-related dilation of cerebral vessels, as well as in subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm. Despite these controversies, responses of human cerebral arterioles to PGE2 have not been elucidated yet.
To determine the vasomotor effect of PGE2 on parenchymal arterioles of the human brain, we assessed isotonic responses of arteriolar rings isolated from fronto-temporo-parietal cortical tissue of patients. In functionally intact parenchymal arterioles (SNP and Ach induced dose-dependent dilation, whereas phenylephrine induced constriction) concentrations of PGE2 up to 10-6 mol/l caused a significant (p< 0.05) dose-dependent dilation, which was inhibited by the EP4 receptor blocker BGC20-1531, but could not be inhibited with EP2 receptor blocker PF-04418948. Higher concentrations of PGE2 evoked significant (p< 0.05) constrictions, which was diminished by blocking EP1 and EP3 receptors with the agent SC-51322. Vascular expression of EP4 receptors was significantly higher than EP2 receptors in human cerebral arterioles.
Our present results explain previous physiological and pathophysiological findings showing that PGE2 is involved in both dilator and constrictor mechanisms in the cerebral circulation, and provides pharmacological targets to intervene in these mechanisms.
Code of conduct/disclaimer available in General Terms & Conditions
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.



Google Analytics is used for user behavior tracking/reporting. Google Analytics works in parallel and independently from MLG’s features. Google Analytics relies on cookies and these cookies can be used by Google to track users across different platforms/services.


Save Settings